Yale Sustainable Food Program

Undergraduate Courses

Agriculture: Origins, Evolution, Crises

Analysis of the societal and environmental drivers and effects of plant and animal domestication, the intensification of agroproduction, and the crises of agroproduction: land degradation, societal collapses, sociopolitical transformation, sustainablity, and biodiversity.

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Thursday, 9:25a.m. - 11:15a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Approaches to Sustainable Food and Agriculture

Introduction to the global food system through critical analysis of four ideological and technical approaches to meeting the world’s food needs: organic farming, relocalization, vertical farming, and food sovereignty. Ways in which context, values, and networks shape the food system. Use of quantitative, social science, and humanities methodologies. Includes visits to Yale Farm sites.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: CSPC

China's Environmental History since 1600

Recent scholarship on climate change, resource management, water conservancy, public sanitation, and the shifting meanings of nature in Chinese culture and science from the early modern period to the present. Ways in which Chinese history and the natural environment have shaped one another; relations between China’s environmental history and contemporary global trends.

Professor: Jonathan Schlesinger

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Democracy and Sustainability

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions.

Professor: Michael Fotos

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: PLSC

Earth, Resources, Energy, and the Environment

Humankind’s interactions with, and place within, the natural world. Plate tectonics and natural disasters, biological evolution and mass extinction, human evolution, population growth and ecology, industrial resources, groundwater and pollution, fossil fuels and energy transitions, the carbon cycle and greenhouse gases, paleoclimates, current global warming, alternative energies, and a planetary perspective on the Earth as a singular oasis in space. Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Professor: David Evans

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Field Science: Environment and Sustainability

A field course that explores the effects of human influences on the environment. Analysis of pattern and process in forested ecosystems; introduction to the principles of agroecology, including visits to local farms; evaluation of sustainability within an urban environment. Weekly field trips and one weekend field trip.

Professor: L. Kealoha Freidenburg

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m. & Thursday, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00p.m.

Material Culture and Iconic Consciousness

Exploration of how and why modern and postmodern societies have continued to sustain material symbolism and iconic consciousness. Theoretical approaches to debates about icons and symbols in philosophy, sociology, linguistics, psychoanalysis, and semiotics. Iconography in advertisements and branding, food and bodies, nature, fashion, celebrities, popular culture, art, architecture, and politics.

Professor: Jeffrey Alexander

Course Type: Undergraduate
Day/Time: Thursday, 9:25a.m. - 11:15a.m.
Program/Subject: SOCY

Media and Medicine in Modern America

Relationships between medicine, health, and the media in the United States from 1870 to the present. The changing role of the media in shaping conceptions of the body, creating new diseases, influencing health and health policy, crafting the image of the medical profession, informing expectations of medicine and constructions of citizenship, and the medicalization of American life.

Professors: John Warner and Gretchen Berland

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Mesopotamian Origins

Analysis of the archaeological and paleoenvironmental data for rain-fed and irrigation agriculture settlement, subsistence, and politicoeconomic innovation in Mesopotamia, from sedentary agriculture villages to cities and states to early empire. Focus on combinations of dynamic social and environmental forces that drove these developments.

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Thursday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: ANTH

Reconstructing Human Evolution: An Ecological Approach

Methods for obtaining data relevant to ecological factors that have affected human evolutionary change, such as changes in climate, competition with other animals, and availability and kinds of food supply. Evaluation of techniques for obtaining ecological data in such fields as geology, paleobotany, and paleozoology. Ethnographic, primatological, and other biological models of early human behavior.

Professor: Andrew Hill

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: ANTH

Styles of Academic and Professional Prose

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Professor: Andrew Ehrgood

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015, Term: Fall 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: ENGL

Sustainable Development in Post-Disaster Context: Haiti

Sustainable Development is studied using the case of Haiti. Haiti suffers from chronic environmental disasters, most notably deforestation that leads to mudslides and therefore crop loss during the rainy season, and acute disasters, for example the earthquake of 2010. F&ES has been asked by L’Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in the Artibonite Valley (north of Port-au-Prince) to provide assistance to projects in villages surrounding the hospital. This course uses lectures, student presentations of scholarly work, project development, and field studies to explore our knowledge of sustainable development and to apply this knowledge. Enrollment limited to sixteen.

Professor: Gordon Geballe

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015, Term: Fall 2015
Day/Time: Wednesday, 2:00p.m. - 5:00p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

The Economics of Africa

Study of key microeconomic issues facing African economies and of the economic tools used to analyze such issues. Topics include infrastructure, land, agriculture, conflict, intrahousehold issues, health and education, microfinance and risk, and coping strategies. Readings from recent literature in microeconomic development. Prerequisites: intermediate microeconomics and econometrics.

Professor: Cheryl Doss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: ECON

Women, Food, and Culture

Interdisciplinary exploration of the gendering of food production, preparation, and consumption in cross-cultural perspective. Topics include agricultural practices, cooking, pasteurization, kitchen technology, food storage, home economics, hunger, anorexia, breast-feeding, meals, and ethnic identity.

Professor: Maria Trumpler

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: WGSS

African Prehistory

Survey of the archaeological evidence for the original contributions of the African continent to the human condition. The unresolved issues of African prehistory, from the time of the first hominids, through the development of food production and metallurgy, to the rise of states and cities.

Professor: Roderick McIntosh

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: AFST

Agriculture: Origins, Evolution, Crises

Analysis of the societal and environmental drivers and effects of plant and animal domestication, the intensification of agroproduction, and the crises of agroproduction: land degradation, societal collapses, sociopolitical transformation, sustainability, and biodiversity.

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: EVST

American Consumer Culture in the Twentieth Century

An interdisciplinary introduction to twentieth-century American consumer culture, exploring the rise (and fall) of mass consumption and its impact on the experience of family, faith, citizenship, community, gender, race, ethnicity, and politics. The changing moral valuations of consumption; the effect of consumerism on ritual life; the Americanization of immigrants and the marketing of race and ethnicity; consumer culture’s reciprocal relations with literature and the arts; the politics of consumer resistance; suburbanization; the consumer model of citizenship.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: HIST

American Environmental History

Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; the impact of technology, agriculture, and industry; the development of resources in the American West and overseas; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the role of planning and impact of public policies.

Professor: Paul Sabin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Approaches to Sustainable Food and Agriculture

Introduction to the global food system through critical analysis of four ideological and technical approaches to meeting the world’s food needs: organic farming, relocalization, vertical farming, and food sovereignty. Ways in which context, values, and networks shape the food system. Use of quantitative, social science, and humanities methodologies. Includes visits to Yale Farm sites.

Enrollment for this course is managed through Preference Selection.

Professor: Mark Bomford

Professor: Mark Bomford
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: CSYC

Aristotelian Statecraft

Connections between working practices and governance from Aristotle to Aquinas to Arendt. Statecraft as a practical art to be understood and informed by the structures and methods of agriculture, navigation, fishing, hunting, cooking, mountaineering, flying, athletics, and shipbuilding. Ways in which actions produce ideas transferable to such matters of statecraft as law and diplomacy.

Professor: Charles Hill

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: HUMS

Asian Environments and Frontiers

The impact of Asian farmers, merchants, and states on the natural world. Focus on imperial China, with discussion of Japan, Southeast Asia, and Inner Asia in the early modern and modern periods. Themes include frontier conquest, land clearance, water conservancy, urban footprints, and relations between agrarian and nonagrarian peoples. Attention to environmental movements in Asia today.

Professor: Kwangmin Kim

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: EAST

Beer in American History

The role of beer, brewing, taverns, and bars in American history, with a focus on the late nineteenth century to the present. Beer’s relations to immigrant and working-class life and politics, debates over taxation and regulation, constructions of masculinity and femininity, and consumer culture. The temperance movement and Prohibition; business and cultural developments after World War II; contemporary microbrewing.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: HIST

Biology of Insect Disease Vectors

Insects transmit pathogens that cause many emerging and re-emerging human and agriculture-related diseases. Many of these diseases, which are referred to as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), have a dramatically negative impact on human health in the developing world. Furthermore, they cause indirect devastation by significantly reducing agricultural productivity and nutrient availability, exacerbating poverty and deepening disparities. This course introduces students to the biological interactions that occur between major groups of important disease vectors and the pathogens they transmit. Lectures cover current research trends that relate to the ecology and physiology of insect vectors. Course content focuses on how these aspects of vector biology relate to the development and implementation of innovative and effective disease-control strategies.
Prerequisite: full year of college/university-level biology, or permission of the instructor(s).
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Wednesday & Thursday, 3:00p.m. - 4:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EMD

Chemistry of Food and Cooking

Fundamental principles for understanding chemical structures and interactions as well as energy and speed of chemical processes. Application of these principles to food and cooking, including demonstrations.

Professors: Elsa Yan, Narasimhan Ganapathi

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: CHEM

Christianity and Environmental Ethics

3 credits. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to core questions and moral frameworks in environmental ethics as they relate to Christianity. Special attention will be given to understanding, critically assessing, and applying the fundamental methodology and environmental philosophy that undergirds environmental ethics as read through the lens of Christian theology and religious moral reasoning. This course will simultaneously allow students to take stock of contemporary issues including but not limited to: global climate change; the moral status of ecosystems; biodiversity loss; the relationship between race, gender, poverty, and the environment; and intersections with other issues such as animal welfare, economics, and agriculture. No prior experience in theology, environmental ethics, or religious ethics is required. Participants will be encouraged to be exploratory, inquisitive, and interactive in their learning.

Professor: Matthew Riley

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: REL

Climate and Society

3 credits. This is an applied climate science course with the aim to provide a broad working knowledge of the Earth’s atmospheric environment. The course deals with pollution and resource issues pertinent to a career in environmental management. Topics include climate system components; climate resources for agriculture; forestry and renewable energy; air pollution and meteorology; anthropogenic drivers of atmospheric and climate changes; climate data resources; the scientific basis of greenhouse gas inventories; and atmospheric models to aid decision making. Biweekly assignments consist of problem sets, data manipulation, inventory scenarios, and model simulations. Students develop skill sets for handling atmospheric data and interpreting atmospheric models. Students also gain experience with state-of-the-art greenhouse gas inventory systems and the latest IPCC climate model products. Three hours lecture. Group project.
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Climate Change in the Media

The history of media representations of climate-change science. Reasons for the lack of public awareness on the issue, including the role of naysayers and corporate media, ineffective scientific messaging, and current media’s emphasis on headlines and on protagonists and antagonists. Traditional and new-media strategies to promote understanding and action.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m. & Thursday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: CSES

Comparative Poetics of Nature

History of the ways in which poetic works have represented nature. The roles of science and philosophy in shaping conceptualizations and artistic representations of nature; romantic conceptions of nature in contemporary environmentalism. Topics include pastoral, representations of food, the sublime, concepts of the organic, and sustainability.

Professor: Stefan Esposito

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Program/Subject: LITR

Democracy and Sustainability

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions. 

Professor: Michael Fotos

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EP&E

Devotion and Practice in Early Christianity

An introduction to the emergence of Christianity as a movement characterized by a set of distinctive practices including ritual, asceticism, and discourse. Students consider how Christianity drew on existing traditions and created a distinctive set of practices involving food, gender, and space, as well as the more obviously “religious” issues of sacrifice, prayer, and scripture reading. Attention is given to material as well as literary evidence from the first five centuries C.E. Area II.

Professor: Andrew McGowan

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Thursday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: REL

Documentary and the Environment

Survey of documentaries about environmental issues, with a focus on Darwin’s Nightmare (2004), An Inconvenient Truth (2006), Food Inc. (2009), GasLand (2010), and related films. Brief historical overview, from early films such as The River (1937) to the proliferation of environmental film festivals.

Professor: Charles Musser

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday, 7:00p.m. - 9:00p.m. & Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 2:30p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Survey of documentaries about environmental issues, with a focus on Darwin’s Nightmare (2004), An Inconvenient Truth (2006), Food, Inc. (2009), GasLand (2010), and related films. Brief historical overview, from early films such as The River (1937) to the proliferation of environmental film festivals.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Economic Performance and Challenges in India

India’s transition from being one of the poorest countries in the world to having one of the fastest-growing economies. Economic reform processes, trade and policy implications, and changes within the agriculture, industry, and service sectors. Prerequisites: Introductory microeconomics and macroeconomics.

Professor: Rakesh Mohan

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: ECON

Economics of Developing Countries

Analysis of current problems of developing countries. Emphasis on the role of economic theory in informing public policies to achieve improvements in poverty and inequality, and on empirical analysis to understand markets and responses to poverty. Topics include microfinance, education, health, agriculture, intra-household allocations, gender, and corruption.

Professor: Nancy Qian

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: ECON

Analysis of current problems of developing countries. Emphasis on the role of economic theory in informing public policies to achieve improvements in poverty and inequality, and on empirical analysis to understand markets and responses to poverty. Topics include microfinance, education, health, agriculture, intrahousehold allocations, gender, and corruption.

After introductory microeconomics.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15p.m.
Program/Subject: ECON

Analysis of current problems of developing countries. Emphasis on the role of economic theory in informing public policies to achieve improvements in poverty and inequality, and on empirical analysis to understand markets and responses to poverty. Topics include microfinance, education, health, agriculture, intrahousehold allocations, gender, and corruption. Prerequisite: Introductory microeconomics.

Professor: Nancy Qian

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: ECON

Energy, Climate, Law, and Policy

Overview of the legal norms governing patterns of energy use and associated adverse effects on climate stability, environmental quality, and human health. Focus on U.S. law and policy, with some consideration of relevant international treaties. Special attention to building efficiency and to land-use regulation and urban growth, particularly coastal prospecting and development. 

Professor: John Wargo

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Monday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

Environmental History of the Caribbean

An environmental history of the Great Caribbean since European arrival, that presents a regional perspective from an ecological and geographical approach instead of the traditional visions of political, social, and cultural fragmentation that prevail. Our major emphasis is on the transformation of tropical ecology, plantation agriculture (based on slave and free labor), relations between humans and animals, changing ideas about regional ecosystems (inferno or paradise?), and the ecological implications of the U.S. economic and political influence over the region.

Professor: Reinaldo Funes Monzote

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Environmental Politics and Law

Exploration of the politics, policy, and law associated with attempts to manage environmental quality and natural resources. Themes of democracy, liberty, power, property, equality, causation, and risk. Case histories include air quality, water quality and quantity, pesticides and toxic substances, land use, agriculture and food, parks and protected areas, and energy.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: PLSC

Exploration of the politics, policy, and law associated with attempts to manage environmental quality and natural resources. Themes of democracy, liberty, power, property, equality, causation, and risk. Case histories include air quality, water quality and quantity, pesticides and toxic substances, land use, agriculture and food, parks and protected areas, and energy.

Professor: John Wargo

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Exploration of the politics, policy, and law associated with attempts to manage environmental quality and natural resources. Themes of democracy, liberty, power, property, equality, causation, and risk. Case histories include air quality, water quality and quantity, pesticides and toxic substances, land use, agriculture and food, parks and protected areas, and energy.

Professor: John Wargo

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Environmental Science and Policy

The synthesis of science, both for scientists and for policy makers. Usefulness of the two types of synthesis for developing scientific research and policy. Advancement of complementary practices between science and policy arenas. Concepts and data from ecological and biogeochemical disciplines are used to predict and manage the effects of environmental change on ecosystem services that underlie the provisioning of resources such as food and clean water.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Program/Subject: EVST

Farm Bill and Politics of Agriculture

Instruction in writing well-reasoned analyses and academic arguments, with emphasis on the importance of reading, research, and revision. Using examples of nonfiction prose from a variety of academic disciplines, individual sections focus on topics such as vision, globalization, generosity, experts and expertise, the good life, and dissent in American culture.

Professor: Barbara Stuart

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: ENGL

Feminist Science and Technology Studies: Porous Bodies

An interdisciplinary reading seminar on how the body is made and remade in and through its environment and via its relationship to the material world. Theoretical engagements with studies of biopower/biopolitics, new feminist/queer materialisms, and critical science studies. Possible topics include colonial climatological theories, environmental toxicities, biomonitoring, viral infection, chemical contamination, the pharmaceutical industry, food technologies, somatechnics, and epigenetics.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Wednesday, 2:30p.m. - 4:20p.m.
Program/Subject: WGSS

Field Science: Environment and Sustainability

A field course that explores the effects of human influences on the environment. Analysis of pattern and process in forested ecosystems; introduction to the principles of agroecology, including visits to local farms; evaluation of sustainability within an urban environment. Weekly field trips and one weekend field trip.

Professor: L. Kealoha Freidenburg

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: EVST

A field course that explores the effects of human influences on the environment. Analysis of pattern and process in forested ecosystems; introduction to the principles of agroecology, including visits to local farms; evaluation of sustainability within an urban environment. Weekly field trips and one weekend field trip.

Professor: L. Kealoha Freidenburg

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m. & Thursday 1:00p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Food and Cuisine

The history of food and culinary styles from prehistory to the present, with a particular focus on Europe and the United States. How societies gathered and prepared food. Changing taste preferences over time. The influence of consumers on trade, colonization, and cultural exchange. The impact of colonialism, technology, and globalization. The current food scene and its implications for health, the environment, and cultural shifts.

Professor: Paul Freedman

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: HIST

Food and Diety in Greco-Roman Antiquity

A review of evidence concerning dietary habits and attitudes in the Greco-Roman world, examining the literary texts and the significance of food and drink in social and religious life and in health care. Readings in translation.

Professor: Veronika Grimm

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: HUMS

Food and Documentary

Survey of contemporary public debates and current scientific thinking about how America farms and eats explored through the medium of documentary film. Includes a brief history of early food and agrarian documentaries, with a focus on twenty-first century films that consider sustainable food.

Professor: Ian Cheney

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday, 7:00p.m. - 9:00p.m., Wednesday, 2:30p.m. - 4:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Food Policy and Science

The science on food and nutrition is connected with pressing policy issues. Topics include hunger, obesity, and the impact of food production and consumption on the environment. 

Professor: Kelly Brownell

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: PSYC

Food Writing

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

ENGL 114 or 120 or permission of instructor.

Please visit the English department Web site to find unique descriptions for each section of this course.
Enrollment for this course is managed through Preference Selection.

Professor: Barbara Stuart

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: ENGL

Forms of Communication and Intimacy

New forms of electronic communication and their effects on social relationships and individuals’ sense of self. Advantages and limitations of these forms in relation to means of communication and intimacy not dependent on electronic mediation. Correspondence by post, in-person conversation and nonverbal communication, social gatherings centered on food, erotic intimacy, group sociability, and silence. Analytical and creative writing assignments.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: ENGL

Gender, Family, and Cultural Identity in Asia and the United States

A cross-cultural dialogue focusing on family, gender, and identity. Exploration of how specific Asian countries and people approach issues of religion, dress, education, and food as identity markers; U.S. perceptions and reactions to similar issues.

Professor: Geetanjali Chanda

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: AMST

A cross-cultural dialogue focusing on family, gender, and identity. Exploration of how specific Asian countries and people approach issues of religion, dress, education, and food as identity markers; U.S. perceptions and reactions to similar issues.

Professor: Geetanjali Chanda

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Global Environmental Governance

The development of international environmental policy and the functioning of global environmental governance. Critical evaluation of theoretical claims in the literature and the reasoning of policy makers. Introduction of analytical and theoretical tools used to assess environmental problems. Case studies emphasize climate, forestry, and fisheries.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: PLSC

Global Environmental History

The dynamic relationship between environmental and social forces from the Pleistocene glaciations to the Anthropocene present. Pleistocene extinctions; transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture; origins of cities, states, and civilization; adaptations and collapses of Old and New World civilizations in the face of climate disasters; the destruction and reconstruction of the New World by the Old. Focus on issues of adaptation, resilience, and sustainability, including forces that caused long-term societal change. 

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

History of British Cuisine

The history of British food from the Middle Ages to the present. Particular characteristics and specialties; ways in which the expansion of the British Empire, economic changes, and recent wars and globalization have influenced the cuisine. Representations of food, agriculture, celebration, and hunger in British culture.

Professor: Paul Freedman, Becky Conekin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: HIST

History of Food and Cuisine

The history of food from the Middle Ages to the present, with a focus on the United States and Europe. How societies gathered and prepared food; culinary tastes of different times and places. The influence of taste on trade, colonization, and cultural exchange. The impact of immigration, globalization, and technology on food.

Enrollment limited to freshmen. Preregistration required; see under Freshman Seminar Program.

Professor: Paul Freedman

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: HIST

History of Housing in America

Introduction to political, economic, and cultural trends that have shaped housing in American cities and suburbs since the nineteenth century. Focus on housing reform, housing policy, and the physical spaces in which class, race, and gender identities are constructed and contested. Topics include tenement reform, suburbanization, urban renewal, public housing, homelessness, and New Urbanism.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

International Environmental Economics

Introduction to international and environmental economics and to research that combines the two fields. Methods for designing and analyzing environmental policy when economic activity and pollution cross political borders. Effects of market openness on the environment and on environmental regulation; international economics and climate change.

Professor: Joseph Shapiro

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: EVST

Introduction to Environmental History

Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; contrasting uses of land; the impact of industry and markets; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the development of public policy; the global search for resources by the United States.

Professor: Paul Sabin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; contrasting uses of land; the impact of industry and markets; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the development of public policy; the global search for resources by the United States.

Professor: Paul Sabin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Ways in which people have shaped and been shaped by the changing environments of North America from precolonial times to the present. Migration of species and trade in commodities; contrasting uses of land; the impact of industry and markets; the rise of modern conservation and environmental movements; the development of public policy; the global search for resources by the United States.

Professor: Paul Sabin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Italian Food and Literature

The intersection of food and literature in Italy from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (Dante, Boccaccio, and the earliest cookbooks) to the modern age (the futurists, Calvino, and others). Discussion of foodways, or how food is tied to religions, holidays, gender roles and identities, and domestic economies. Consideration of film.

Professor:Risa Sodi

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: HUMS

Lives in Ancient Egypt

Introduction to the social history of ancient Egypt from 3,100 to 30 B.C.E. Focus on the lives of particular individuals attested in the textual and archaeological record, from pharaohs and queens to artists, soldiers, and farmers. Reading of primary sources in translation; course projects integrate ancient objects in Yale collections.

Professor: Colleen Manassa

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: ARGC

Long-Form Food Writing

Classic food stories as a model for nonfiction writing of all kinds. Focus on long-form essays and profiles, including their structure, voice, and reporting. Writing assignments are read and critiqued in class. Writing sample required. Enrollment limited to 15.

Professor: Burkhard Bilger

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: CSBR

Management and Environment

Management issues and opportunities driven by climate change, energy, and so-called green businesses. Emerging approaches to attaining sustainability, including green accounting and boards, industrial ecology, and the triple bottom line. The role of science in environmental policy. Ecological and public health perspectives contrasted with economic and political approaches. The role of special interests, public perception, negotiation, and conflict resolution.

Professor: Garry Brewer

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Mesopotamia's Literary Legacy

Major works of ancient Near Eastern literature; relationships with literary traditions in the Hebrew Bible and ancient Greece. Readings include myths, epics, wisdom literature, love poetry, and humorous stories.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: HUMS

Mesopotamian Origins

Analysis of the archeological and paleoenvironmental data for rain-fed and irrigation agriculture settlement, subsistence, and politicoeconomic innovation in Mesopotamia, from sedentary agriculture villages to cities and states to early empire. Focus on combinations of dynamic social and environmental forces that drove these developments. 

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Thursday, 9:25a.m. - 11:15a.m.
Program/Subject: ANTH

Analysis of the archeological and paleoenvironmental data for rain-fed and irrigation agriculture settlement, subsistence, and politicoeconomic innovation in Mesopotamia, from sedentary agriculture villages to cities and states to early empire. Focus on combinations of dynamic social and environmental forces that drove these developments. 

Professor: Harvey Weiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Thursday, 9:25a.m. - 11:15a.m.
Program/Subject: ARGC

Modern Families, Identities, and Cultures in Asia and the United States

A cross-cultural dialogue focusing on family, gender, and identity. Exploration of how specific Asian countries and people approach issues of religion, dress, education, and food as identity markers; U.S. perceptions and reactions to similar issues.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.m
Program/Subject: AMST

Nature Writing in Britain and the English-speaking world

Natural history and environmental writing in the English-speaking world from the late eighteenth century to the present. Readings include Gilbert White’s Natural History of Selborne, Thoreau’s Walden, and Darwin’sVoyage of the Beagle, as well as recent work by writers from Canada, the United States, India, and South Africa.

Pre-1900 with permission of instructor.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Program/Subject: HUMS

Observing Earth from Space

A practical introduction to satellite image analysis of Earth’s surface. Topics include the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, satellite-borne radiometers, data transmission and storage, computer image analysis, the merging of satellite imagery with GIS and applications to weather and climate, oceanography, surficial geology, ecology and epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, archaeology, and watershed management.

Professor: Xuhui Lee

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: ARGC

A practical introduction to satellite image analysis of Earth’s surface. Topics include the spectrum of electromagnetic radiation, satellite-borne radiometers, data transmission and storage, computer image analysis, the merging of satellite imagery with GIS and applications to weather and climate, oceanography, surficial geology, ecology and epidemiology, forestry, agriculture, archaeology, and watershed management.

Prerequisites: college-level physics or chemistry, two courses in geology and natural science of the environment or equivalents, and computer literacy.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: ARGC

Plants and People

The interaction of plants and people throughout history explored from biological, historical, anthropological, and artistic perspectives. Basic botany; plants in the context of agriculture; plants as symbols; plants in the environment. Includes visits to the Peabody Museum, the Marsh Botanical Garden, and the Yale Art Gallery.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: E&EB

The interaction of plants and people throughout history explored from biological, historical, anthropological, and artistic perspectives. Basic botany; plants in the context of agriculture; plants as instruments of trade and societal change; plants as inspiration; plants in the environment. Includes field trips to the greenhouses at Yale Marsh Botanical Garden, the Yale Peabody Museum and Herbarium, the Yale Farm, and the Yale Art Gallery.

Professor: Linda Puth

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday & Friday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.
Program/Subject: E&EB

Political Ecology

Study of the relationship between society and the environment. Global processes of environmental conservation, development, and conflicts over natural resource use; political-economic contexts of environmental change; ways in which understandings of nature are discursively bound up with notions of culture and identity.

Professor: Amity Doolittle

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Tuesday 1:20p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Psychology, Biology, and Politics of Food

A study of eating as it affects the health and well-being of every human. Taste preferences, food aversions, the regulation of hunger and satiety, food as comfort, friendship, and social ritual; the politics of food, including sustainable agriculture, organic farming, genetically modified foods, nutrition policy, and food and agriculture industries; malnutrition, eating disorders, and the global obesity epidemic; food advertising aimed at children, poverty and food, and effects of the modern environment on eating.

Professor: Kelly Brownell

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Reconstructing Human Evolution: An Ecological Approach

Methods for obtaining data relevant to ecological factors that have affected human evolutionary change, such as changes in climate, competition with other animals, and availability and kinds of food supply. Evaluation of techniques for obtaining ecological data in such fields as geology, paleobotany, and paleozoology. Ethnographic, primatological, and other biological models of early human behavior.

Professor: Andrew Hill

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: ANTH

Methods for obtaining data relevant to ecological factors that have affected human evolutionary change, such as changes in climate, competition with other animals, and availability and kinds of food supply. Evaluation of techniques for obtaining ecological data in such fields as geology, paleobotany, and paleozoology. Ethnographic, primatological, and other biological models of early human behavior.

Professor: Andrew Hill

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Program/Subject: ANTH

Roman Food and Drink

Eating and drinking as occasions for social, political, literary, and cultural exchanges in ancient Rome. Close reading of texts on the production and preparation of food, invitations to meals, and descriptions of meals in works by Petronius and Juvenal. A bridge course between L4 and other L5 courses.

Professor: Joseph Solodow

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: LATN

Science and Technology in the United States

The development of science and technology in American society from the colonial period through the late twentieth century. The rise of the United States to a world-class scientific and technological power; the American scientific community and the tensions it has faced in a democratic society; the role of science and technology in exploration, agriculture, industry, national defense, religion, culture, and social change.

Professor: Daniel Kevles

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: AMST

The development of science and technology in American society from the colonial period through the late twentieth century. The rise of the United States to world-class scientific and technological power; the American scientific community and the tensions it has faced in a democratic society; the role of science and technology in exploration, agriculture, industry, national defense, religion, culture, and social change.

Professor: Daniel Kevles

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 1:30p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

The development of science and technology in American society from the colonial period through the late twentieth century. The rise of the United States to a world-class scientific and technological power; the American scientific community and the tensions it has faced in a democratic society; the role of science and technology in exploration, agriculture, industry, national defense, religion, culture, and social change.

Professor: Daniel Kevles

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:25p.m.
Program/Subject: AMST

Structure, Function, and Development of Vascular Plants

Morphogenesis and adaptation of trees from seed formation and germination to maturity. Physiological and developmental processes associated with structural changes in response to environment are discussed from both a phylogenetic and an adaptive point of view.

Professor: Graeme Berlyn

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Styles of Academic and Professional Prose

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include legal, humor, travel, or nature writing; writing about medicine and public health, religion, the visual arts, or food; writing in the social sciences; writing reviews of the performing arts; and writing for radio. May be repeated for course credit in a section that treats a different genre or style of writing; may not be repeated for credit toward the major.

Professors: Andrew Ehrgood, Randi Epstein, Colleen Kinder, John Loge, Paula Resch, Margaret Spillane, Barbara Stuart

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: ENGL

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include science writing, food writing, legal writing, writing in the social sciences, and writing about the arts. Prerequisite: ENGL 114 or 120 or permission of instructor. Not open to freshmen in the fall term.

Professors: Allyson McCabe, Margaret Spillane, Barbara Stuart

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Program/Subject: ENGL

A seminar and workshop in the conventions of good writing in a specific field. Each section focuses on one academic or professional kind of writing and explores its distinctive features through a variety of written and oral assignments, in which students both analyze and practice writing in the field. Section topics include science writing, food writing, legal writing, writing in the social sciences, and writing about the arts. Prerequisite: ENGL 114 or 120 or permission of instructor. Not open to freshmen in the fall term.

Professors: Andrew Ehrgood, Colleen Kinder, John Loge, Paula Resch

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Program/Subject: ENGL

Sustainability and Institutions: Innovation and Transformation

Sustainable development as it relates to institutional change, decision-making processes, and systems thinking. The origins, theory, and grounding principles of sustainable development. The application of those principles, using Yale University as a case study.

Professor: Julie Newman

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Thursday, 2:30p.m. - 4:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

The Economics of Africa

Study of key microeconomic issues facing African economies and of the economic tools used to analyze such issues. Topics include infrastructure, land, agriculture, conflict, intrahousehold issues, health and education, microfinance and risk, and coping strategies. Readings from recent literature in microeconomic development.

Professor: Cheryl Doss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: ECON

Study of key microeconomic issues facing African economies and of the economic tools used to analyze such issues. Topics include infrastructure, land, agriculture, conflict, intrahousehold issues, health and education, microfinance and risk, and coping strategies. Readings from recent literature in microeconomic development.

Professor: Cheryl Doss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: ECON

The History of Food

The history of food and culinary styles from prehistory to the present, with a particular focus on Europe and the United States. How societies gathered and prepared food. Changing taste preferences over time. The influence of consumers on trade, colonization, and cultural exchange. The impact of colonialism, technology, and globalization. The current food scene and its implications for health, the environment, and cultural shifts.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

The Russian Festive Table in Literature, Film, and Art

The Russian custom of the food feast (zastol’e) as a social and cultural institution with respect to ritual, communication, and identity. Ways in which literature, film, and visual art portray this specifically Russian mode of celebration, bonding, and interpersonal enjoyment. Development of advanced Russian language proficiency with a focus on describing in detail, supporting opinions, stating hypotheses, and using extended discourse. Eight classes conducted around a traditional Russian table offering authentic cuisine. Prerequisite: RUSS 160a or equivalent.

Professor: Risa Lipson

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 2:30p.m. - 3:45p.m.
Program/Subject: HUMS

The Science of Water

A study of water in its physical, chemical, biological, astronomical, geological, and environmental aspects. Topics include water’s role in food and energy production, conservation and pollution, magnetic field generation, plate tectonics and volcanism, climate, and security.

Professor: Kanani Lee

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: G&G

A study of water in its physical, chemical, biological, astronomical, geological, and environmental aspects. Topics include water’s role in food and energy production, conservation and pollution, magnetic field generation, plate tectonics and volcanism, climate, and security.

Professor: Kanani Lee

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.
Program/Subject: G&G

The Variety of Food Histories in East Asia

Various approaches to the study of food and foodways in East Asia, including perspectives from history, anthropology, and literature. Food aromas in constructions of stereotypes; possession of particular foodstuffs in relation to power; restaurants that provide atmosphere and service in addition to food.

Professor: Akira Shimizu

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: EAST

Urbanization and the Environment in China and India

Study of contemporary urbanization processes in China and India, with a focus on environmental challenges and sustainable development. Energy, food, water, and land-use systems; manufacturing, industry, and technology; cultures and lifestyles. Introduction to conceptual and analytical tools for assessing the effects of urbanization.

Professors: Karen Seto and Angel Hsu

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 2:30p.m. - 3:45p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Urbanization, Food Systems, and the Environment

Trends in urbanization that affect the production and demand for food in the twenty-first century. Implications for natural resources such as agricultural and pasture lands. The simultaneous demographic, economic, and biophysical processes of urbanization; the life cycle of food, from production, processing, and distribution to demand, consumption, and waste.

Professor: Karen Seto

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: EVST

Women, Food, and Culture

Interdisciplinary exploration of the gendering of food production, preparation, and consumption in cross-cultural perspective. Topics include agricultural practices, cooking, pasteurization, kitchen technology, food storage, home economics, hunger, anorexia, breast-feeding, meals, and ethnic identity.

Professor: Maria Trumpler

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: WGSS

Interdisciplinary exploration of the gendering of food production, preparation, and consumption in cross-cultural perspective. Topics include agricultural practices, cooking, pasteurization, kitchen technology, food storage, home economics, hunger, anorexia, breast-feeding, meals, and ethnic identity.

Professor: Maria Trumpler

 
 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2011
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: WGSS

Interdisciplinary exploration of the gendering of food production, preparation, and consumption in cross-cultural perspective. Topics include agricultural practices, cooking, pasteurization, kitchen technology, food storage, home economics, hunger, anorexia, breast-feeding, meals, and ethnic identity.

Professor: Maria Trumpler

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 2:20p.m.