Yale Sustainable Food Program

Graduate Courses

Sustainable Development in Post-Disaster Context: Haiti

Sustainable Development is studied using the case of Haiti. Haiti suffers from chronic environmental disasters, most notably deforestation that leads to mudslides and therefore crop loss during the rainy season, and acute disasters, for example the earthquake of 2010. F&ES has been asked by L’Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in the Artibonite Valley (north of Port-au-Prince) to provide assistance to projects in villages surrounding the hospital. This course uses lectures, student presentations of scholarly work, project development, and field studies to explore our knowledge of sustainable development and to apply this knowledge. Enrollment limited to sixteen.

Professor: Gordon Geballe

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015, Term: Fall 2015
Day/Time: Wednesday, 2:00p.m. - 5:00p.m.
Program/Subject: EVST

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a historically grounded account of the transformation of rural societies. Four hours lecture plus discussion sections.

Professor: James Scott, Michael McGovern

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: F&ES

Agrarian Societies: Culture, Society, History, and Development 

An interdisciplinary examination of agrarian societies, contemporary and historical, Western and non-Western. Major analytical perspectives from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and environmental studies are used to develop a historically grounded account of the transformation of rural societies. Four hours lecture plus discussion sections.

Professors: James Scott and Michael McGovern

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Climate and Life

This is an applied climate science course with the aim to provide a broad working knowledge of the Earth’s atmospheric environment. The course deals with pollution and resource issues pertinent to a career in environmental management. Topics include climate system components; climate resources for agriculture; forestry and renewable energy; air pollution and meteorology; anthropogenic drivers of atmospheric and climate changes; climate data resources; the scientific basis of greenhouse gas inventories; and atmospheric models to aid decision making. Biweekly assignments consist of problem sets, data manipulation, inventory scenarios, and model simulations. Students develop skill sets for handling atmospheric data and interpreting atmospheric models. Students also gain experience with state-of-the-art greenhouse gas inventory systems and the latest IPCC climate model products. Three hours lecture. Group project.

Professor: Xuhui Lee, Nadine Unger

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

Climate and Society

3 credits. This is an applied climate science course with the aim to provide a broad working knowledge of the Earth’s atmospheric environment. The course deals with pollution and resource issues pertinent to a career in environmental management. Topics include climate system components; climate resources for agriculture; forestry and renewable energy; air pollution and meteorology; anthropogenic drivers of atmospheric and climate changes; climate data resources; the scientific basis of greenhouse gas inventories; and atmospheric models to aid decision making. Biweekly assignments consist of problem sets, data manipulation, inventory scenarios, and model simulations. Students develop skill sets for handling atmospheric data and interpreting atmospheric models. Students also gain experience with state-of-the-art greenhouse gas inventory systems and the latest IPCC climate model products. Three hours lecture. Group project.
Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

3 credits. This is an applied climate science course with the aim to provide a broad working knowledge of the Earth’s atmospheric environment. The course deals with pollution and resource issues pertinent to a career in environmental management. Topics include climate system components; climate resources for agriculture; forestry and renewable energy; air pollution and meteorology; anthropogenic drivers of atmospheric and climate changes; climate data resources; the scientific basis of greenhouse gas inventories; and atmospheric models to aid decision making. Biweekly assignments consist of problem sets, data manipulation, inventory scenarios, and model simulations. Students develop skill sets for handling atmospheric data and interpreting atmospheric models. Students also gain experience with state-of-the-art greenhouse gas inventory systems and the latest IPCC climate model products. Three hours lecture. Midterm exam/term paper. Group project.

Professors: Nadine Unger, Xuhui Lee

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Conservation Science

This advanced course applies ecological principles to understand and manage biodiversity and attendant ecosystem functioning and services in the anthropocene. The course addresses the ethical and functional basis for conservation and fosters thinking about why and how humans ought to share the planet with nonhuman life. It covers scientific principles such as evolution, life-history and the viability of species, species endangerment and extinction risk, the kinds of biodiversity, the spatial distribution of biodiversity, the functional roles of species in ecosystems, vulnerability and risk assessments, and valuing biodiversity and ecosystem services. The course applies these principles to the exploration of such topics as biodiversity’s role in the functioning and sustainability of ecological systems, restoration of environmental damages, conserving biodiversity in dynamic landscapes, adapting landscapes to climate change, balancing conservation with urban development and agriculture, and renewable energy siting. It provides students with the quantitative skills to conduct population viability analyses, geospatial analyses of the distribution of biodiversity across landscapes, vulnerability analyses, and decision-analysis to balance trade-offs among multiple objectives of human land development and biodiversity conservation.

Professor: Oswald Schmitz

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

Contemporary Environmental Challenges in Africa

3 credits. The objective of this seminar is to provide students with in-depth insight into the dynamics of human-environment interactions in sub-Saharan Africa in a collaborative and open discussion format. Families, communities, and nations in the African region face an array of environmental challenges ranging from periodic drought and food insecurity to loss of biodiversity, conflict over resources, and persistent poverty. Moreover, many countries in the region are saddled with histories of colonial rule that defined human-environment relationships in the simplest terms, often posing direct causal links between traditional practices and environmental degradation while ignoring the complex interplay of social, biophysical, and geographical factors that contribute to environmental outcomes. 

Professor: Robert Bailis

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 3:50p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Environmental Law and Policy

3 credits. Introduction to the legal requirements and policy underpinnings of the basic U.S. environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and various statutes governing waste, food safety, and toxic substances. This course examines and evaluates current approaches to pollution control and resource management as well as the “next generation” of regulatory strategies, including economic incentives and other market mechanisms, voluntary emissions reductions, and information disclosure requirements. Mechanisms for addressing environmental issues at the local, regional, and global levels are also considered.

Professor: E Donald Elliot

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Friday 10:10a.m. - 1:00p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Financing Green Technologies

Financing Green Technologies

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Wednesday, 2:40p.m. - 5:40p.m.
Program/Subject: MGT

Food Security and Agricultural Development

This seminar focuses on issues of food security in developing countries in the broader context of the changes that are occurring in the agricultural sector at the local (individual farmers, households), community, national, and global levels. As the food industry transforms, who is being included and who is being left out? What are the implications for smallholder producers and consumers? What are the relationships among agricultural development, food security, and poverty reduction? To what extent is there increasing volatility in food markets? And finally, what other factors, especially security and conflict issues, affect food security? Gender issues are integrated throughout the course topics. The course readings draw heavily on materials in economics and agricultural economics, supplemented with relevant policy documents and articles from other disciplines.

Professor: Cheryl Doss

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

Food Systems and Environmental Law

3 credits. A complex web of agricultural and food laws substantially influences what ends up on our plates, and ultimately affects the health of individuals, communities, and their ecosystems. These policies, and the regulatory mechanisms supporting them, play a vital role in determining health outcomes for our nation and the level of environmental impact to shared natural resources such as air, water, soil, and biodiversity. In the context of these policies, the course will cover diverse ecological issues through the lens of federal environmental statutes. The course will also cover key public health issues related to food production and distribution such as the U.S. Farm Bill, nutrition assistance programs, food access, obesity and malnutrition, food safety and foodborne diseases, genetically engineered foods, organic and other certification schemes, and the debate about food systems and sustainability. Emrollment limited to 20.

Professor: Jason Czarnezki

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Tuesday, 2:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Four Commodities: Mitigation Strategies for the Environmental Impact of Agriculture

This course examines a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture, focusing primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues are also touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lectures focus on specific case studies as much as possible. 

Professor: Gordon Geballe

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 4:00p.m. - 5:30p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Future of Food: Environment, Health & Law

Professor: John Wargo

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Monday, 1:30p.m. - 4:20p.m.

Global Aspects of Food and Nutrition

The course presents a core topic in global health and development that is at the intersection of science, society, and policy. The course familiarizes students with leading approaches to analyzing the causes of malnutrition in countries around the world and to designing and evaluating nutrition interventions. It covers micronutrient and macronutrient deficiencies; approaches to reducing malnutrition; the cultural, economic, environmental, agricultural, and policy context within which malnutrition exists; and the relationships between common infections and nutritional status.

Professor: Debbie Humphries

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: EMD

Introduction to Environmental Health

Environmental Health focuses on human health effects of exposure to chemical, physical, and biological agents in the community, workplace, and home. This course teaches the principles and tools related to recognizing, assessing, understanding, and mitigating the impacts of environmental agents. Topics include air and water pollution, foodborne illness, climate change, energy use, occupational health, children’s health, environmental justice, and pesticide use.
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30a.m. - 9:50a.m.
Program/Subject: EHS

Introduction to Regulatory Affairs

This course provides students with an introduction to regulatory affairs science, as these issues apply to the regulation of food, pharmaceuticals, and medical and diagnostic devices. The course covers a broad range of specialties that focus on issues including legal underpinnings of the regulatory process, compliance, phases of clinical testing and regulatory milestones, clinical trials design and monitoring, quality assurance, post-marketing study design in response to regulatory and other needs, and post-marketing risk management. The complexities of this process require awareness of leadership and change management skills. Topics to be discussed include: (1) the nature and scope of the International Conference on Harmonization, and its guidelines for regulatory affairs in the global environment; (2) drug development, the FDA, and principles of regulatory affairs in this environment; (3) the practice of global regulatory affairs from an industry perspective; (4) description/structure/issues of current special importance to the U.S. FDA; (5) historical background and FDA jurisdiction of food and drug law; (6) the drug development process including specification of the important milestone meetings with the FDA; (7) risk analysis and approaches to its evaluation; (8) use of Bayesian statistics in medical device evaluation, a new approach; (9) use of data monitoring committees and other statistical methods for regulatory compliance; (10) developments in leadership and change management; and (11) food quality assurance including risk analysis/compliance/enforcement. Through course participation, students also have opportunities to meet informally with faculty and outside speakers to explore additional regulatory issues of current interest.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Thursday, 10:00a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: BIS

Land Use Planning: Local & Regional

3 cr. This course explores land use planning practice, regional planning, and the tools planners use to gain consensus amongst diverse constituencies. Land use plans and the techniques that implement them determine where development occurs on the American landscape. Planners play a key role in determining how the needs of nations’ growing population for housing and non-residential development are accommodated and how the landscape is protected from the adverse impacts of additional land development. Planning, zoning, and other land use regulations are the principal techniques employed to achieve safe and livable communities and to conserve critical landscapes. In most of the 50 states, land use planning and regulation is conducted principally at the local level, while regional planning is encouraged, but seldom required. For regional landscapes to be planned effectively, the competitive tensions among local governments–and their land use plans–must be mediated.

Professor: David Kooris

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Thursday, 5:30p.m. - 8:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Linkages of Sustainability

3 credits, lecture and discussion. The Earth system is made up of interdependent components—land, water, energy, biota, and nonrenewable resources, all of which have physical limits. Societies transform these resources into useable goods, and production and consumption cycles connect people and places across space and time. This team-taught course provides an overview of these linkages and explores their implications for applying and measuring the concept of sustainability. It examines the constraints to sustainability imposed by those linkages (e.g., the energy required to supply water), opportunities for their transformation, and challenges of implementing sustainability across complex social and cultural systems.

Professors: Thomas Graedel, Karen Seto

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Managing Resources

Resource sustainability requires knowing how to “get things done” with resources, whether one’s goal is policy, investment, or on-the-ground management. The challenge of resource management is knowing how to provide the many commodity and noncommodity objectives people demand from the terrestrial ecosystems across time and space. This management can be cost-effective and applicable to many places with the proper integration of management and social scientific knowledge. Students master the scientific basis, methods (and reasons for the methods), and techniques for management of various resources. The course covers managing an ecosystem with concerns about water, agriculture, grazing, wildlife, timber, recreation, people, and hazards of wind, fire, avalanche, and flood. The class examines the basic issues and describes tools and techniques for analyzing and managing. Case studies of specific areas are used for many of the analyses. The course covers systems concepts; decision analysis; area, volume, and other regulatory systems; silvicultural pathways; growth models; wind and fire hazard analyses; habitat and biodiversity analyses; carbon sequestration; payment for ecosystem services; cash flow; operations scheduling; portfolio management; monitoring; and continuous quality improvement and adaptive management. Class includes lectures and exercises in which students integrate these subjects.

Professor: Chadwick Oliver, Michael Ferrucci

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

3 credits. Resource sustainability requires knowing how to “get things done” with resources, whether one’s goal is policy, investment, or on-the-ground management. The challenge of resource management is knowing how to provide the many commodity and noncommodity objectives people demand from the terrestrial ecosystems across time and space. This management can be cost-effective and applicable to many places with the proper integration of management and social scientific knowledge. Students master the scientific basis, methods (and reasons for the methods), and techniques for management of various resources. The course covers managing an ecosystem with concerns about water, agriculture, grazing, wildlife, timber, recreation, people, and hazards of wind, fire, avalanche, and flood. The class examines the basic issues and describes tools and techniques for analyzing and managing. Case studies of specific areas are used for many of the analyses. The course covers systems concepts; decision analysis; area, volume, and other regulatory systems; silvicultural pathways; growth models; wind and fire hazard analyses; habitat and biodiversity analyses; carbon sequestration; payment for ecosystem services; cash flow; operations scheduling; portfolio management; monitoring; and continuous quality improvement and adaptive management. Class includes lectures and exercises in which students integrate these subjects.

Professor: Chadwick Oliver

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

3 credits. Resource sustainability requires knowing how to “get things done” with resources, whether one’s goal is policy, investment, or on-the-ground management. The challenge of resource management is knowing how to provide the many commodity and noncommodity objectives people demand from the terrestrial ecosystems across time and space. This management can be cost-effective and applicable to many places with the proper integration of management and social scientific knowledge. Students master the scientific basis, methods (and reasons for the methods), and techniques for management of various resources. The course covers managing an ecosystem with concerns about water, agriculture, grazing, wildlife, timber, recreation, people, and hazards of wind, fire, avalanche, and flood. 

Professor: Chadwick Oliver

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:20a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Managing Sustainable Operations

Managing Sustainable Operations

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:20p.m.

Marketing & Sustainability

Marketing & Sustainability

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:10a.m. - 11:30p.m.
Program/Subject: MGT

Mitigating Agriculture’s Impact

This course examines a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture, focusing primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues are also touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lectures focus on specific case studies as much as possible. The course is divided into four modules, each focused on a single commodity that represents a different set of impacts and mitigation strategies: beef, aqua-cultured salmon, palm oil, and fresh-sold tomatoes. Brief contextual reference to the economic and social importance of each commodity is made at the beginning of each module. By doing a deep dive in each of these modules, students gain a significant appreciation for the mitigation strategy opportunities available in the production, processing, and distribution specific to an agricultural resource type.

Professor: Gordon Geballe

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

Multifunctional Carbon-Sequestering Agroforestry

This course examines the range of carbon-sequestering agricultural practices and their potential to provide solutions to a range of social and environmental problems from climate justice to land degradation. It introduces a global toolkit of practices old and new and profiles promising plant species. A key group of species profiled is perennial staple crops, a group of trees and other long-lived plants providing protein, carbohydrates, and fats for human consumption. We explore industrial ecological applications of perennial crops for materials, chemicals, and energy. While many tropical species and systems are already implemented on a large scale, the course also closely views cold-climate developments. Participants are introduced to the farm business planning challenges of production in regenerative integrated systems. Diverse strategies for implementation are presented, including policy, grassroots, and consumer-driven options

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: F&ES

Natural Capital

Natural Capital

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30p.m. - 9:50p.m.
Program/Subject: MGT

Natural Capital: Risks and Opportunities in Global Resource Systems

Natural resource constraints affect most, if not all, functional areas of the modern corporation.
Many large companies are taking proactive approaches to managing these risks and capturing
the opportunities they create. As such, they are increasingly expecting their employees to have a basic familiarity with the environmental and social, as well as the economic, megatrends affecting these systems. This course is built around six global resource systems – materials, energy, food, water, climate, land and biodiversity.

Professor: Brad Gentry

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Program/Subject: MGT

Organic Pollutants in the ENvironment

3 credits. An overview of the pollution problems posed by toxic organic chemicals, including petroleum, pesticides, PCBs, dioxins, chlorinated solvents, and emerging contaminants. Processes governing the environmental fate of organic pollutants, e.g., evaporation, bioconcentration, sorption, biodegradation. Technologies for prevention and remediation of organic pollution.

Professor: Shimon Anisfeld

Course Type: Graduate
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Producing and Consuming Nature

This intermediate to advanced seminar brings together readings in social theory with ethnographic case studies to examine the changing means by which elements of the natural world are drawn into circuits of production, exchange, and consumption.  How do environmental goods become conceptualized as natural resources for human ends, and, more specifically, remade into commodities that circulate in global markets?  The course explores efforts to rethink classical theories of economic processes in light of shifting forms of natural resource transactions and use.  Topics examined include agrarian and fisheries transformations; the rise of green consumerism and product certification regimes; and the market valuation of ecosystem goods and services. Course texts are drawn from anthropology and related disciplines, like cultural geography, sociology, and science and technology studies.

Professor: Karen Hébert

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:00p.m. - 3:50p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Remote Sensing of Land Cover and Land Use Change

This is an advanced course on the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor land use and land cover change. The course emphasizes digital image processing techniques to detect landscape dynamics using data from NASA’s satellites. Topics include pre-processing data for change detection, accuracy assessment of change maps, and methodologies to detect changes such as urban expansion, deforestation, seasonal variations in vegetation, agricultural expansion, vegetation health, and wildfires. Lecture and lab.

Professor: Karen Seto

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014
Program/Subject: F&ES

Research Topics: Food Nutrition Obesity

In-depth discussion and analysis of current research topics on bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and obesity. Topics include, but are not limited to, physiology, cultural influences, treatment studies, body image, binge eating, and epidemiology.

Professor: Kelly Brownell

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2012
Program/Subject: PSYC

In-depth discussion and analysis of current research topics on bulimia, anorexia nervosa, and obesity. Topics include, but are not limited to, physiology, cultural influences, treatment studies, body image, binge eating, and epidemiology.

Professor: Kelly Brownell

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2013
Program/Subject: PSYC

Seminar in Soil Conservation and Management

1, 2, or 3 credits. Soils are important to food security, providing food, fiber, and shelter for humans and terrestrial wildlife. Soils are also important sinks of atmospheric carbon, more so than the aboveground terrestrial vegetation for many types of ecosystems. Worldwide, soils are constantly impacted by unsustainable management practices in agriculture, forestry, and other human activities, as well as by climate change. However, sustainable techniques geared to increasing soil conservation can mitigate or reverse detrimental effects on soils. This is an advanced course in soil science, and enrolling students are expected to have sufficient background such as graduate or undergraduate courses in soil science. Prerequisite: undergraduate- or graduate-level soils courses.

Professor: Florencia Montagnini

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Monday, 1:00p.m. - 3:50p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Seminar: Land Use Planning

1 credit. Land use plans and the techniques used to implement them determine where development occurs on the American landscape. Planners play a key role in determining how the needs of the nation’s growing population for housing and nonresidential development are accommodated and how natural resources and environmental functions are protected from the adverse impacts of land development. This course explores the multifaceted discipline of land use planning and its associated ecological implications, particularly related to climate change. Land use encompasses the interacting factors of land function, building design, and economic and community support. Strategic land use shrewdly identifies land purposes, incentivizes energy-efficient and climate-resilient structures, and harnesses community and market support for effective land use decision making. In doing so, land use planning possesses the capacity to maximize utility while minimizing environmental damage. In this seminar, students learn from guest speakers and related readings. 

Professor: John Nolon

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2012
Day/Time: Tuesday, 4:00p.m. - 5:00p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Social Justice in the Food System

This course explores social justice in today’s globalized food system. We learn about strategies and discourses used by community-based activists, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and scholars in order to understand injustice, and work to create a more just food system for all. We begin by developing an understanding of the food system as one that encompasses farm and industry workers, farm owners and collectives, and agroecological systems, as well as all those who consume food. Based on this understanding, we review injustice in the food system from multiple sectors and standpoints. We also explore concepts used to frame current critical food studies and movements, including environmental justice, food justice, and food sovereignty, and we consider how these are applied in multiple contexts, both within the United States and globally. We examine several ideological debates among current food justice activists and scholars, including the extent to which neoliberalism and racial oppression are reinscribed through alternative food initiatives and framings, as well as the legitimacy of analyzing food systems as dichotomous, either/or arrangements. 

Professor: Kristin Reynolds

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: F&ES

This course explores social justice in today’s globalized food system. We learn about strategies and discourses used by community-based activists,  nonprofit organizations, and scholars in order to understand injustice and work to create a more just food system for all. We begin by developing an understanding of the food system as one that encompasses farm and industry workers; farm owners and collectives; animals and agroecological systems, as well as all those who consume food. Based on this understanding, we discuss various forms of injustice and explore frameworks used by critical food scholars and activists to create more socially just systems. We consider how concepts including food justice, food sovereignty, and critical race theory are applied within the United States and globally, and how they might inform policy advocacy at multiple scales. We also examine ideological debates among current food justice activists and scholars, including the extent to which neoliberalism and racial oppression are reinscribed through alternative food initiatives and framings, as well as the legitimacy of analyzing food systems as dichotomous, either/or arrangements. The course includes guest speakers.

Professor: Kristin Reynolds

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:00p.m. - 3:50p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Soil Science

functioning of soils, and how this relates to ecosystem responses and feedbacks to environmental changes. The class covers both natural and managed landscapes. Fieldwork and associated labs. Prerequisites: F&ES 530a and 515a, or permission of the instructor.

Professor: Mark Bradford

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 9:00a.m. - 10:20a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Southern Forest and Forestry Field Trip

This course augments our forestry curriculum by providing a forum for viewing and discussing forestry and forest management with practitioners. The trip provides forestry and other interested students with an opportunity to experience the diversity of forested ecosystems and ownership objectives ranging from intensively managed pine plantations to restoration and protection of endangered habitats. Students discuss forest management issues—including forest health, fragmentation, policy, law, and business perspectives—with landowners and managers from large industries, nonindustrial private landowners, TIMOs, federal and state land managers, NGOs, and forestry consultants. We also tour sawmills, paper mills, and other kinds of forest products processing facilities, active logging operations, and, weather permitting, participate on prescribed fires. Not least, we experience the unique cultures, food, and hospitality of the southeastern United States. The course can be taken for 1 credit by any student at F&ES or combined with the 2-credit Forest Operations course for 3 credits.

Professor: Ann Camp

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2014

Strategies for Land Conservation

Strategies for Land Conservation

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday, 2:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: MGT

Supply Chain Management

Supply Chain Management

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 2:40p.m. - 4:00p.m.
Program/Subject: MGT

Sustainable Agriculture Systems

3 credits. Designing and implementing agricultural systems that minimize environmental harm and benefit people is necessary to sustainable development. Agricultural systems are human-constructed systems that both depend on and impact the environment. Therefore understanding these ecosystems requires approaches from ecology, economics, sociology, philosophy, and other fields. This course will cover material spanning these multiple perspectives to try to answer the question: What is a sustainable agricultural system? Upon completion of the course, students will be equipped to understand and apply knowledge of (1) the core elements of producing and distributing food, (2) the environmental and human challenges posed by and to agriculture, and (3) potential solutions for achieving sustainable food systems. This course will be discussion-based, focus on reading primary literature, and students will write a paper that integrates perspectives from natural and social sciences to consider the sustainability of a particular agricultural system.

Professor: Stephen Wood

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Technological and Social Innovation in Global Food Systems

1–3 credits. This course examines a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture, focusing primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues are also touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lectures focus on specific case studies as much as possible. The course is divided into four modules, each focused on a single commodity that represents a different set of impacts and mitigation strategies: e.g., beef, aqua-cultured salmon, palm oil, and fresh-sold tomatoes. Brief contextual reference to the economic and social importance of each commodity is made at the beginning of each module. Students gain a significant appreciation for the mitigation strategy opportunities available in the production, processing, and distribution specific to an agricultural resource type.
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

1–3 credits. This course examines a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture, focusing primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues are also touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lectures focus on specific case studies as much as possible. The course is divided into four modules, each focused on a single commodity that represents a different set of impacts and mitigation strategies: e.g., beef, aqua-cultured salmon, palm oil, and fresh-sold tomatoes. Brief contextual reference to the economic and social importance of each commodity is made at the beginning of each module. Students gain a significant appreciation for the mitigation strategy opportunities available in the production, processing, and distribution specific to an agricultural resource type.

Professor: Gordon Geballe

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2016
Day/Time: Thursday, 2:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

The Engineering and Ownership of Life

The seminar explores the historical development of intellectual property protection in living matter. Focusing on the United States in world context, it examines arrangements outside the patent system as well as within it. Topics include agriculture, medicine, biotechnology, and law. May be taken as a reading or research course.

Professor: Daniel Kevles

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2012
Day/Time: Wednesday, 3:30p.m. - 5:20p.m.
Program/Subject: HIST

The Entrepreneurial Approach to Environmental Problem Solving

This course provides a format for students ready to develop entrepreneurial plans for specific environmental businesses. There are two aspects to any business: knowing the technical subject, and understanding the business environment. It is assumed that students have a background in both aspects, and this course is to enable the students to work in groups to “flesh out” a business. The course has regular meetings, but much of the work—and reporting—is done by the students, with advice and input from the faculty and others at Yale and in the business world. The course (and its prerequisite) may be used in conjunction with competing for the Sabin Prize

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2013
Program/Subject: F&ES

The Future of Food

 This seminar will explore significant challenges posed by the global food supply to environmental quality and human health. The primary obligation is a research paper, dissertation chapter, master’s project, or senior essay draft. We will read critically 150-200 pages per week, and be prepared to discuss or present analyses.

Challenges we will examine include: fresh v processed foods, nutritional sufficiency and excess, radionuclides, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, animal feeds, plastics, flame retardants, flavors, fragrances, ingredient fraud, genetic modification, waste, energy input and yield, locality, processing technologies, packaging, and carbon emissions. Corporate case histories will be considered in a number of sessions.  Private innovations in the production and management of food will be analyzed, including trends in certification & labeling initiatives.  Most sessions will examine one or several foods. Examples include: cow’s milk, human milk, infant formula, grapes, wine, corn, bananas, tomatoes, salmon, cod, tuna, sodas, fruit juice, water, coffee, and olive oil.

Professor: John Wargo

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Fall 2014
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:00p.m. - 3:50p.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

The Political Economy of Global Energy Policy

3 credits. This course addresses the global energy challenge from four distinct perspectives: public policy, security, sustainability, and development. The course surveys (1) the major theoretical frameworks that are being employed to analyze how countries around the world design and implement public policies toward the energy sector; topics include theories of the state, monopoly, regulation, public choice, global institutions, and policy making; (2) the political economy and outcomes of electricity market liberalization; (3) the methodological challenges in evaluating and comparing fossil-fuel-based and renewable supply technologies; (4) the nexus between energy security, food security, and economic development; (5) the challenges associated with fossil fuels in an increasingly carbon-constrained world; (6) the promises and physical limitations of renewable energy technologies; and (7) the risks, uncertainties, demise, and continued promise of nuclear power.
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Tuesday, 9:00a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Valuing the Environment

3 credits. This quantitative course demonstrates alternative methods used to value environmental services. The course covers valuing pollution, ecosystems, and other natural resources. The focus of the course is on determining the “shadow price” of nonmarket resources that have no prices but yet are considered valuable by society. Taught every other year. Three hours lecture.

Professor: Robert Mendelsohn

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2013
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: F&ES

Water Quality in Public Health

The diminished quality of ambient and drinking water supplies globally is linked to urbanization, industrialization, and the competitive use of water for domestic, industrial, and agricultural purposes. Although the presence of pathogens remains the focus for drinking water treatment in both developed and undeveloped countries, direct and indirect exposures to chemical contaminants in water is a growing environmental health concern. This course emphasizes the occurrence, characterization, and impact of chemical toxicants—both natural and anthropogenic—in surface and ground waters, as well as transport and fate in the hydrosphere. The history, development, and current regulatory approaches to drinking water and ambient water quality monitoring and protection are presented from a public health perspective.
Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2015
Day/Time: Thursday, 10:00a.m. - 11:50a.m.
Program/Subject: EHS